Job Readiness

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Job Readiness Behavior Standards. The controlling purpose of the College is to prepare students for profitable employment. The behaviors of the College students are expected to match what is common in business and industry for gaining and keeping employment. Standards are stated in five levels on the College Job Readiness Work Ethic Chart.


LEVEL 4 are examples of ideal standards, worthy of special note, praise or reward.
LEVEL 3 are examples of above-average performance, showing extra effort.
LEVEL 2 are considered average, up to usual, expected, "Job Ready" standards.
LEVEL 1 are considered to be those exhibited when "learning" or “trying" to comply.
LEVEL 0 are those considered to be unacceptable for an employee or for a student.


Instructors may consider industry standards for attendance, behaviors, and/or safety as a part of the academic grading system per the syllabus.

Job Readiness Work Ethic Chart - Long Form.pdf
Job Readiness Short Form.pdf


Safety. Safety is of prime importance in any work place. Work place standards for safety are upheld at the College. Students place themselves and the College in jeopardy when they act in an unsafe manner. Safety is listed first on the Job Readiness Work Ethic Chart due to its importance to the College, and to future employers of the graduates, in terms of liability. Personal safety equipment and safe operation of all machinery and vehicles are expected of all College students. Industrial safety standards (FAA, OSHA, etc.) apply, as appropriate, to College shops, laboratories, field experiences, and internships. Where posted, safety glasses or other devices are to be worn. Horseplay, unsafe driving, misuse of machines, refusals to wear proper safety gear, and other safety violations can lead to poor grades or progressive discipline.


Trust. Trust is an expectation in any work place. Work place standards for trust are upheld at the College. Trust is also included in the Job Readiness Work Ethic Chart. Students who lie, cheat, steal, or are academically dishonest place themselves in jeopardy of lowered grades. Students also face law enforcement, court sanctions, and progressive discipline.


Timeliness. Timeliness is an expectation in any work place. An employee or student who cannot be relied upon to start tasks and complete them on time without undue reminders or oversight is a liability to the work place - or to the classroom, shop or lab - because resources are redirected to keep them on task. Work place standards for timeliness are upheld at the College and are included in the Job Readiness Work Ethic Chart. Timeliness can impact grades. Instructors may reduce credit for late assignments as provided in the syllabus.


Work Habits. Positive work habits are expected in any work place. Employees or students are expected to possess a work ethic that is inferred from behaviors that show them to be diligent, responsible, and organized. Work place standards for work habits are upheld at the College and are included in the Job Readiness Work Ethic Chart. When positive work habits are coupled with good skills and timeliness, it is evident that the employee or student takes pride in his or her work and has a good work ethic. Poor work habits can impact class grades. Instructors may reduce credit for assignments or projects where skill levels, timeliness, and class standards have been compromised by poor habits, poor quality, low output, or inactivity, as provided in the syllabus.


Interpersonal Habits. Positive interpersonal habits are expected in any work place. In addition to attending to specific tasks and doing the assigned work, the employee or student is expected to show that he/she is civil, polite, and respectful to himself/herself and others in the environment. Work place standards for interpersonal relations are upheld at the College and are included on the Job Readiness Work Ethic Chart. Any act of insubordination is considered to be a violation of interpersonal relations. An employee who is insubordinate risks being fired. A student who is insubordinate risks progressive discipline. The student who displays a lack of civility and who creates bad feelings by hurtful words or slurs, or by the use of threats to do harm or by acts of violence which create harassment or a hostile environment (whether in person or by written, oral, visual, symbolic, or electronic means) risks progressive discipline. The employee risks being fired.


Citizenship. Positive citizenship is expected in the work place. In addition to traditional expectations for job skills and work ethic, employers are increasingly placing demands on employees to be law abiding citizens who are in compliance with local, state, and federal laws, as well as the social expectations of the community and the work place. Work place standards for citizenship are upheld at the College and are included on the Job Readiness Work Ethic Chart. Citizenship applies to the rules of the College and to the laws existing outside of the College. Good citizenship contributes to elevating the quality of a work place environment and to elevating the quality of the College environment. Employees or students should be able to expect that those in the environment will follow the law and the rules. When the employee violates this expectation, he or she risks being fired. The student risks progressive discipline.


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